Bipartisanship Alive in Washington

In a previous PolicyMic article, I highlighted individual senators and representatives that were working in a bipartisan manner to fix our nation’s problems. I’ve also written twice about No Labels, a non-partisan group working with Congress to break the gridlock. I am pleased now to highlight three groups of legislators of both parties that have decided working together is the only way we will resolve the critical issues facing this country.

Fix Congress Now Caucus

This is a new group founded by Representatives Scott Rigell (R-Va.), Reid Ribble (R,Wisc.), Kurt Schrader (D-Ore.), and Jim Cooper (D-Tenn.). As stated on the caucus’ website, “The mission of the caucus is simple: we will identify, agree upon, and move forward legislation and rule changes that will fix this institution to such a degree that we are able to fully meet our deep obligation to our fellow Americans -- and to our children and grandchildren. And we will be bold in our efforts to truly make a difference.”

Center Aisle Caucus

This caucus has been around for a while. Created in 2006 by Representatives Tim Johnson (R-Ill.) and Steve Israel (D-N.Y.), the caucus is committed to promoting civility and dialogue in Congress. In addition to discussing issues, the caucus holds informal social gatherings to foster friendship that welcomes discussion while accepting differences.

Gang of Six

The best known of the three is the Gang of Six. These six Senators, Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), Kent Conrad (D-N.D.), Mark Warner (D-Va.), Tom Coburn (R-Okla.), Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.), and Mark Crapo (R-Idaho), continue to work on resolving the federal deficit. 

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Douglas Goodman

Retired military and Quality Assurance / Warehouse Operations and Distribution Manager. Have enjoyed politics since the Kennedy/Nixon debates. Besides good political discussions, I've been involved in campaigns at all levels as well as having served on school, city, and county committees and boards. Been called weird because I enjoy reading government legislation and other government rules and regulations.

MORE FROM

What does Sean Spicer’s resignation mean for the rest of Trump’s inner circle?

Many are already wondering if Spicer's departure could portend more shakeups to come.

How the messy New York City subways are hurting vulnerable New Yorkers the most

The New York subway system is a mess — and here's who's suffering the most.

Is Sean Spicer the shortest-serving White House press secretary in history?

Spicer served just six months as press secretary — there are some cabinet members in White House history who have served mere days.

5 stories from this week that aren't about OJ Simpson or Sean Spicer

The White House will be forced to release logs from Mar-a-Lago, and Democrats finally have an agenda.

According to Anthony Scaramucci’s Twitter, he believes in climate change and voted for Barack Obama

He also supports same-sex marriage. And abortion rights.

Trump is reportedly looking into pardoning himself. Here’s why that could backfire.

Can the president really pardon himself?

What does Sean Spicer’s resignation mean for the rest of Trump’s inner circle?

Many are already wondering if Spicer's departure could portend more shakeups to come.

How the messy New York City subways are hurting vulnerable New Yorkers the most

The New York subway system is a mess — and here's who's suffering the most.

Is Sean Spicer the shortest-serving White House press secretary in history?

Spicer served just six months as press secretary — there are some cabinet members in White House history who have served mere days.

5 stories from this week that aren't about OJ Simpson or Sean Spicer

The White House will be forced to release logs from Mar-a-Lago, and Democrats finally have an agenda.

According to Anthony Scaramucci’s Twitter, he believes in climate change and voted for Barack Obama

He also supports same-sex marriage. And abortion rights.

Trump is reportedly looking into pardoning himself. Here’s why that could backfire.

Can the president really pardon himself?