Burger King Just Made a Sneaky Move Straight Out of 'Risk'

Burger King apparently shares Russian President Vladimir Putin's finely honed expansionist instincts as the company is swiftly moving in to fill the Big Mac-shaped void left behind by McDonald's hasty exit from Crimea.

Crimean residents may soon regain access to mass-produced burger patties, as the fast-food chain announced its plans of opening outlets there.  

"We are planning to open in Crimea, but I cannot say when exactly it will happen or how many outlets the company will have," Dmitry Medovy, the CEO of Burger King Russia told Itar-Tass on Wednesday.

McDonalds had shut down operations in the cities of Simferopol, Sevastopol and Yalta on April 4, citing "manufacturing reasons independent of McDonald's." While it repeatedly denied the withdrawal was prompted by Crimea's political unrest, according to the Moscow Times, McDonald's had "hinted" at "logistical difficulties" associated with Crimea's incorporation into Russian territory. The fast-food staff had the offer to relocate permanently to Ukraine, where they would be placed in the same job with the same salary, along with relocation costs.  

The Moscow Times offers a detailed rundown of the rivalry for burger supremacy in Russia, wherein the 24-year dominance over the fast-food market (since the days of the Soviet era) by McDonald's was threatened by Burger King's rapid ascent to the No. 2 spot in just four years since it first opened in a Moscow shopping mall.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Iva Dixit

Iva Dixit is a newly minted journalist-in-progress, working towards a Master's Degree from Columbia Journalism School. Her interests include gaps of all kinds: culture, gender, wage and thigh. Ask her a question or tell her your story.

MORE FROM

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.