CNN Turns a Boring Royal Visit Into a Racist Nightmare in Just 13 Seconds

How long does it take for the most trusted news source to turn a boring non-story into a racist, xenophobic nightmare?

About 13 seconds it turns out, and that's only because CNN news correspondent Jeanne Moos takes her time narrating the intro.

Earlier this month, Prince William, the Duchess of Cambridge and chubby-cheeked baby George took their first visit overseas. There's not much to say about royal trips abroad, aside from cute playdate photos with the commoners, but CNN, bless their hearts, found a way to make us sit up and wonder what century they belong in.

Because if there's anything Americans are good at, it's finding new and horrible ways to make honoring indigenous traditions and experiencing other cultures about weird dances, things that baffle white people and butts.


You've got to watch this and see for yourself how bad it gets. Just when you think the segment has peaked, it expands the scope of its awfulness. Not just satisfied with comparing the traditional dances of Maori warriors (including those who welcomed former first lady Laura Bush during a visit to soldiers in Afghanistan) to Chippendales and horny emus, Moos gleefully highlights diplomats and world leaders "going native."

Yeah, she actually said that.

So, how long does it take for CNN to transform into your weird, clueless right-wing relative who's just discovered chain emails? About two minutes, it looks like.

And if you need more, you're in luck: CNN has a playlist available for your delectation called "The Wacky World of Jeanne Moos."

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Esther Bergdahl

Esther is the copy chief at Mic. She has degrees from the University of Chicago and the Medill School of Journalism, which means she has a lot of feelings about both Shakespeare and Studs Terkel.

MORE FROM

'Hot Mic' podcast: GOP Senate health care, Comey tapes, 2016 election data stolen

The important stories to get you caught up for Friday

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Hot Mic' podcast: GOP Senate health care, Comey tapes, 2016 election data stolen

The important stories to get you caught up for Friday

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.