Wisconsin Recall Means Voters Are Tired With the Left, and Will Rein in Government

After a long and bitter recall process, Scott Walker on Tuesday kept his seat as governor of Wisconsin, with 53% of the vote. So what does Walker's win mean? It's important for a number of reasons.

It means that people realize that Walker's reforms are working in Wisconsin. It means that voters are tired of the tax-and-spend policies of the left, and they're ready to rein in government. It signals that collective-bargaining and excessive public worker benefits are things of the past.

Walker’s win is important because it clears the path for other states to pass similar reforms. Many other states have Republican majorities in the state house and the supportive governors, and they are poised to pass similar reforms.

This also has meaning on a national level. President Bill Clinton rightly called Wisconsin "America's Battleground" because it's a microcosm for the state of affairs on the national level. Walker's win suggests that the presidential election in November won't be an easy victory for Obama. If Wisconsin turns red, it's very likely that other swing states will too.

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Christine Harbin

Christine Harbin considers widespread economic freedom to be one of the most important goals for sound public policy. She holds undergraduate degrees in economics, mathematics, and French from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and an MBA from the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire.

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