The First Guy to Buy Legal Marijuana in Spokane, Washington Is Just Perfect

The First Guy to Buy Legal Marijuana in Spokane, Washington Is Just Perfect

Recreational marijuana went on sale in Washington state Tuesday, and at least one Spokane man wanted to make it an event to remember.

Mike Boyer camped out for 19 hours in front of Spokane’s only dispensary to make sure he’d be the first in town to get legal weed. The local news station interviewed him and he — well, he’s pretty much exactly what you’re picturing. Take a look:


The tie-dye shirt! The 'stache! The chill demeanor! It’s as if the very concept of legal recreational marijuana manifested itself physically.

The bad news: There’s no way around it — Boyer lost his job thanks to the stunt. He worked as a security guard, but a client saw him on the news and tattled to his company. He took it like a champ, though.

“Yeah, it was kind of a buzzkill,” he told Vocativ. “But I wasn’t going to let it ruin an awesome day.”

Still, a job’s a job, and Boyer is hoping to turn his newfound fame into a new employment opportunity (maybe somewhere with a lenient drug policy). He put his resume up in a Craigslist post with the title “LOST MY JOB! still #1 tho!!”

As for the rest of the state: The legalization starts slow, with only a few stores around the state open for business on Tuesday. Licensed marijuana growers, who have to be in-state, have not yet had the opportunity to grow a full crop.

Whether the recreational product will succeed is still up in the air. Customers told the New York Times they were only buying for the sentimental value, since medical marijuana (and illegal marijuana) is cheaper and relatively easy to obtain. The state levies a 25% tax on every purchase.

Those high prices didn’t stop a store in Bellingham from selling more than $30,000 worth of weed in its first day, beating out the average sales in Colorado, the only other state to legalize the drug recreationally. Colorado is expecting $1 billion in sales over the next fiscal year, meaning $134 million in taxes and fees for the state.



Image Credit: Colorado budget proposal

It’s still a little early for similar predictions for Washington, meaning  individual buyers like Boyer have become the story. After entertaining onlookers with chants of, "What do we want? Marijuana. When do we want it? 2 p.m.," he made his purchase. The plan from there?

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Matt Connolly

Matt has written for Mother Jones, the Washington Examiner and Chicago Public Radio among many others. He's a resident of Washington, D.C., but much like Bruce Springsteen and pork roll he is a product of New Jersey.

MORE FROM

Sam Brownback: 3 things to know about Trump’s nominee for ambassador-at-large for religious freedom

Brownback was a key sponsor of the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998, which created the job he's now nominated for.

Hundreds rally in Times Square to protest Donald Trump’s transgender military ban

“I’m out here to support my trans brothers and sisters who have been serving our military for years and years and years."

Several Republicans are strongly denouncing Trump’s military transgender ban

“Anybody who wants to serve in the military should serve in the military. I don’t agree with the president.”

Worried Trump might pardon himself? Blame Alexander Hamilton.

Hamilton might not have been "thinkin' past tomorrow" when he pushed for broad executive privileges.

Harry Truman desegregated the military 69 years ago. Today, Trump banned transgender troops.

Truman wanted to end discrimination in the military "as rapidly as possible."

Here is a timeline of Donald Trump’s relationship with Jeff Sessions

Trump continued his Twitter attacks on Sessions Wednesday — reportedly while the embattled attorney general was in the White House.

Sam Brownback: 3 things to know about Trump’s nominee for ambassador-at-large for religious freedom

Brownback was a key sponsor of the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998, which created the job he's now nominated for.

Hundreds rally in Times Square to protest Donald Trump’s transgender military ban

“I’m out here to support my trans brothers and sisters who have been serving our military for years and years and years."

Several Republicans are strongly denouncing Trump’s military transgender ban

“Anybody who wants to serve in the military should serve in the military. I don’t agree with the president.”

Worried Trump might pardon himself? Blame Alexander Hamilton.

Hamilton might not have been "thinkin' past tomorrow" when he pushed for broad executive privileges.

Harry Truman desegregated the military 69 years ago. Today, Trump banned transgender troops.

Truman wanted to end discrimination in the military "as rapidly as possible."

Here is a timeline of Donald Trump’s relationship with Jeff Sessions

Trump continued his Twitter attacks on Sessions Wednesday — reportedly while the embattled attorney general was in the White House.