Green Day 'American Idiot', Bruce Springsteen 'Born in the USA' and 5 Suggestions For the New National Anthem

America's national anthem is a storied song, frequently belted out before sporting events of all types. Francis Scott Key's "The Star-Spangled Banner" has reigned supreme over the land since it was officially recognized as the national anthem on July 27, 1889. In my book, 123 years is quite enough time for one song. The Star-Spangled Banner" had a decent run, but does anyone really know (or for that matter care about) what a rampart is?

The easy choice for a replacement would fall on the shoulders of 'The Boss,' Mr. Bruce Springsteen and his timeless song, "Born in the U.S.A."


Just slightly behind this fan favorite, is another classic, oldies-rock, America-themed song. Neil Diamond's "America" is the heart of what it means to 'come to America.'


While these two songs are easily the crowd favorites, they simply don't get the job done for America in the 21st century. That is why I am proposing a new American national anthem. I have compiled the five best representations of what it means to be in, and to be an American, in today's world.
 

5. Kid Rock:"American Bad Ass"

 
Kid Rock's timeless song highlights what makes America, AMERICA! With a catchy tune this hard rock legend solidifies the bad-ass nature of the red, white, and blue.
 

4. Green Day: "American Idiot"

This classic punk anthem helped the millenial generation define themselves, and find their rebellious roots. Furthermore this powerful song was adapted into a live-action, award-winning Broadway musical. The title track from Green Day's seventh studio album represents what American exceptionalism and nationalism have to offer the world.
 

3. David Bowie feat. Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails: "I'm Afraid of Americans"


This masterful song by the ever-popular David Bowie was reinterpreted by Trent Reznor, the brilliant visionary behind Nine Inch Nails. This lyrically powerful song highlights what America has to offer and chronicles the appeal of American culture. Furthermore it accentuates the connection that America has with God -- a vital part of understanding America.
 

2. Trey Parker:"America, Fuck Yeah!"


Created as the theme song for the 2004 movie Team America: World Police, this song has served as the calling card for American foreign policy. This song has also programmed Americans, both domestic and abroad, to shout "Fuck Yeah!" after hearing the word "America." A clever and sharply written song, Trey Parker's quintessential melody will continue to inspire for generations to come.


1. Rammstein: "Amerika"


While songs five through two definitely represent America in song form, nothing comes close to the masterpiece that is "Amerika." The refrain boldly states "We're all living in America," a lyric that underscores that the world clearly envies American culture and society;  a central message of the song. Rammstein zeroes in on what American culture has so generously given the world: Coca-Cola, Mickey Mouse, and the WonderBra [Yes this brassiere was designed in Canada, but, more importantly, first patented in America]. By repeatedly declaring that "Amerika is Wunderbar," the message that "America is Wonderful" is able to be conveyed beyond just English speakers. The boys at Rammstein also incorporate the melting pot of American immigration by alluding to "Mother Tongues." And most importantly, they emphasize the American love of war -- essential to understanding how we so willingly give democracy to the world. 

The case has now been made for what song should replace "The Star-Spangled Banner" as America's national anthem. I would suggest to all readers that they should begin to study this powerful and eloquent song, because it is sure to precede America's sporting events sometime in the near future.