There's a Twitter Account for the Female Scientist Legos, and It's Absolutely Amazing

There's a Twitter Account for the Female Scientist Legos, and It's Absolutely Amazing

The news: The brand-new "Research Institute" Lego set featuring three female scientists now has its own Twitter account, and it's unquestionably amazing.


@LegoAcademics takes the characters and places them in situations familiar to any academic, like doing paperwork instead of research or battling the perils of college email services.

The account is the work of Donna Yates, an archaeologist who works at the University of Glasgow. She told the Washington Post that she bought the new Lego set during a bout of "nerdish glee," and that the photos are inspired by her own experiences as an academic.

There is clearly an audience for these characters. As Yates told the Post, this latest Lego set has "made some amends" in the area of marketing toward women and girls.

Besides the Twitter account, sales of the Research Institute set have skyrocketed, and it's currently sold out on Lego's website. Hopefully, Lego executives will see the positive response and continue to feature these kinds of products.

Because when it comes down to it, we need them. The effort to create the Research Institute Lego set didn't come entirely from the company — it also came in part from a 7-year-old girl who wanted to see the girls doing the same things the boys did.


Image Credit: TheSocietyPages.org

Science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) jobs are dominated by men. As long as these fields continue to employ women in lower numbers — they made up just 26% of the STEM workforce in 2011 — we need to accessible examples of women in these areas.

As @LegoAcademics shows, even adults can appreciate the lady Legos. The earlier we can show children that women can succeed in STEM fields, the better. But Yates' project proves that it's never too late to get interested.

Though we're definitely not done when it comes to improving diversity in Legos — an elementary school class recently pointed out its lack of non-white characters — we're slowly getting there.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Sophie Kleeman

Sophie is a staff writer at Mic covering the intersection of tech and culture. She's based in New York and can be reached at sophie@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Anthony Scaramucci acknowledges “colorful language” after ‘New Yorker’ published his wild rant

Scaramucci's "colorful language" revealed the high-stakes tension going on at the White House.

Lindsey Graham says he is creating legislation to block Trump from firing Mueller

Graham said earlier that ousting Mueller would mark the "beginning of the end of the Trump presidency."

Despite Trump, military leaders say there will be no changes to transgender policy for now

“In the meantime, we will continue to treat all of our personnel with respect."

Trump will visit Long Island to discuss gang violence — but some fear he could make the issue worse

Trump has celebrated mass deportations as fighting gang violence — but are his words helping or hurting?

Like his boss, Anthony Scaramucci seems to be a fan of disgraced football coach Joe Paterno

President Donald Trump also gave a shout-out to the late Penn State coach during the 2016 campaign.

‘Hot Mic’ podcast: Transgender ban, GOP healthcare struggling, video games relieve work stress

What you need to know for Thursday, July 27.

Anthony Scaramucci acknowledges “colorful language” after ‘New Yorker’ published his wild rant

Scaramucci's "colorful language" revealed the high-stakes tension going on at the White House.

Lindsey Graham says he is creating legislation to block Trump from firing Mueller

Graham said earlier that ousting Mueller would mark the "beginning of the end of the Trump presidency."

Despite Trump, military leaders say there will be no changes to transgender policy for now

“In the meantime, we will continue to treat all of our personnel with respect."

Trump will visit Long Island to discuss gang violence — but some fear he could make the issue worse

Trump has celebrated mass deportations as fighting gang violence — but are his words helping or hurting?

Like his boss, Anthony Scaramucci seems to be a fan of disgraced football coach Joe Paterno

President Donald Trump also gave a shout-out to the late Penn State coach during the 2016 campaign.

‘Hot Mic’ podcast: Transgender ban, GOP healthcare struggling, video games relieve work stress

What you need to know for Thursday, July 27.