Will Ferrell Is Raising Huge Money for Cancer Patients in the Most Unusual Way

Will Ferrell Is Raising Huge Money for Cancer Patients in the Most Unusual Way
Source: AP
Source: AP

Will Ferrell hates cancer. But he does love playing video games — and using them to help others in the fight against cancer makes the best of a bad situation.

On Wednesday, Ferrell announced an Indiegogo campaign to raise $375,000 for two cancer charities: DonateGames.org and Cancer for College (founded by Ferrell's friend, Craig Pollard). The best perk for donors: If you donate $10 or more, you might be selected to play video games with Ferrell and top gamers in San Francisco, and have the event live-streamed on Twitch.

"I'll bring the roll of quarters, all I ask is for you to make a donation in support of children and families suffering from cancer," Ferrell wrote on the campaign page.

Check out his announcement video below:

Source: YouTube

"I know the popular perception of gamers is that we're all extremely motivated, highly philanthropic and impossibly good looking. Let's not alter people's perceptions of us," Ferrell says in the video.

This isn't the first time Ferrell has leveraged his celebrity to raise funds for cancer charities: Back in May, he staged an epic drumming contest on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon with his freakish look-alike, Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer Chad Smith — raising over $300,000 from the event (the pair will face off for round two later this month):

Source: YouTube

Ferrell's Indiegogo campaign has already raised more than $40,000 after just a day of fundraising, with perks for donors including hoodies, cowbells, limited edition Xbox controllers, and more.

If you really, really hate cancer too, check out the page, donate, and maybe face off against Ferrell yourself.

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Eileen Shim

Eileen is a writer living in New York. She studied comparative literature and international studies at Yale University, and enjoys writing about the intersection of culture and politics.

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