Watch a Pennsylvania State Senator Come Out as Gay in the Most Perfect Way

Watch a Pennsylvania State Senator Come Out as Gay in the Most Perfect Way

This is how it's done. 

During a press conference on Tuesday, Pennsylvania State Sen. Jim Ferlo of Pittsburgh came out as gay in the most brilliant, poignant way.

"Hundreds of people know I'm gay," Ferlo said. "I just never made an official declaration. I never felt I had to wear a billboard on my forehead. But I'm gay. Get over it. I love it. It's a great life."

The press conference was to discuss changes to Senate Bill 42 and House Bill 177, two bills sponsored by Ferlo which would expand Pennsylvania's hate crime law to include attacks based on sexuality and gender identity. "The legislature's current push to amend the law was sparked by a Sept. 11 incident in which two gay men were allegedly beaten in Philadelphia," Huffington Post reports. 

Following Ferlo's candid admission, Rep. Brian Sims told other lawmakers, "Let's keep this going." the Huffington Post notes that the recent attack took place in Sims' district. Sims became Pennsylvania's first openly gay legislator in 2012.

Bravo, Sen. Ferlo.

Editors Note: Mar. 3, 2015 

An earlier version of this article cited Huffington Post reporting, but did not include quotations around the cited passage. The story has been updated to fully attribute the Huffington Post's language.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Jared Keller

Jared Keller is the former director of news at Mic.

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