A Bra "Try-On" Truck Going to Drive Around to Help Women Find the Best Bras

A Bra "Try-On" Truck Going to Drive Around to Help Women Find the Best Bras
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Shopping for bras is a nuisance. There are the ill-fitting cups, the too-tight straps, the scratchy lace. On top of that, as is standard practice, we have to drag ourselves to a store to try on the darn things, shedding our clothes in cold dressing rooms with bad lighting.

But no more. Say hello to the "National Try-On Truck Tour" from the lingerie company True&Co., a mobile shop that will travel to major cities in the United States in 2016, giving women everywhere the chance to try on lingerie. 

Starting Jan. 12 in San Francisco, shoppers at the mobile shop will get a free fitting and a set of recommended styles from True&Co.'s "fit therapists." They can then try on the recommended bras in fitting rooms installed inside the 24 feet by 8 feet mobile shop, which will be complete with merchandise displays.

It's all part of the company's goal to help women find the perfect-fitting bra. 

Source: True&Co.
Source: True&Co.

The truck fitting starts with a five-minute online "Fit Quiz" to help you identify the best bra fit and style, similar to the one on the website that asks common fitting questions, like band width and cup size, as well as details like the shape of your breasts, typical problems and even your boob position in the bra (are you "bottom happy"?).

The company's algorithm uses the quiz answers to give users a color on the "TrueSpectrum," which details their breast shape and ideal fit. Based on that profile, users get a curated selection of bras from different brands and potentially even in different sizes. 

Source: True&Co.
Source: True&Co.

True&Co. is far from the only company trying to use technology to improve the bra shopping process, including gathering customer data. Online bra shop Brayola creates a "virtual dresser" for shoppers based on the bras that customers already own and love. The company Third Love has an app to help shoppers find their best fit and provides a "breast shape dictionary," which is probably a lot more helpful than sticking a phone between your breasts to figure out your size.

For its part, True&Co. wants women "to look at themselves in the mirror and feel like the most beautiful version of themselves, which is what a beautiful bra does," Michelle Lam, the company's founder, told Fast Company

A mobile fitting station is one approach. The Try-On Truck will make its way from the West Coast to the East Coast over the course of 12 months, starting in California.

h/t PSFK