Donald Trump retweets account calling for "HUNTIN" of Black Lives Matter activists

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Less than a half hour after the commencement of the first 2016 vice presidential debate between Democratic Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Republican Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump retweeted a post saying "I agree" to a white supremacist calling Kaine a "cuckold."

In the original tweets, an account using the display name "John T. (vote Trump)" commented on the debate with the all-caps message "KAINE THE CUCKOLD IS QUITE AN INTERRUPTER!" Another account, "Elisa," responded "I agree. Kaine looks like a fool!"

Source: Twitter

Minutes later, Trump then quoted the second tweet to his main account, which is followed by 12.1 million other accounts.

Source: Twitter

The original "John T. (vote Trump)" account is obviously racist.

For one, the term cuckold has taken on obviously bigoted overtones in right-wing politics in recent years as a disparaging reference to interracial relationships.

Tweets on the account suggest the German government is conducting "white genocide" by supposedly encourage sex with refugees, call for retaliatory group "HUNTIN" of Black Lives Matter activists in response to the beating of a white teenager, and say mentally ill, unarmed black man Alfred Olango was "ASKIN 2 GET SHOT" by El Cajon, California police.

Other tweets on the account addressed the matter of refugee resettlement by saying "KILL THEM ALL, THATS RIGHT ALL!!" and suggested the murder of Queens, New York's Imam Alala Uddin Akongi was an example of the aphorism "WHAT COMES AROUND GOES AROUND."

Trump's questionable decision to amplify the racist account is not, however, an anomaly.

Examples of the real-estate mogul's Twitter controversies this year include mocking and belittling women in sexist terms, posting an anti-Semitic image which had previously circulated on a white supremacist board, and retweeting an infographic featuring factually incorrect statistics on black crime originally created by neo-Nazis.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Tom McKay

Tom is a staff writer at Mic, covering national politics, media, policing and the war on drugs. He is based in New York and can be reached at tmckay@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.