WhiteHouse.gov scrubs climate change, LGBTQ, more issues from official site after Trump takes office

Source: Mic/Getty Images

It's official. Donald Trump is the president of the United States. 

In with the new and out with the... civil rights, climate change policy, health care.

These are just some of the many issues scrubbed Friday from the White House's official website, after Trump's inauguration

The website's transformation, from former-President Barack Obama's administration to Trump's administration demonstrated the stark differences between the two.

The issues included on the White House's official website on Friday morning, while Obama was still officially president
Source: Internet Archive

The website went from offering 27 topics under the "issues" tabs to just six: energy, foreign policy, jobs, military, law enforcement and trade deals. 

While the Obama adminstration's White House page offered "criminal justice reform," Trump's offered "standing up for our law enforcement community."

The issues currently available on the White House's official website under the Trump administration
Source: WhiteHouse.gov

While Obama's White House website included "climate change," Trump's offered an "America first energy plan."

Where there was "women," there is now nothing. 

The change did not go unnoticed on social media, where people decried the elimination of so many topics and identities. 

The wider range of subjects available under the Obama administration allowed for an inclusion that the revised one seems to lack thus far. 

The "Iran deal" page is gone, replaced by pages such as, "America first foreign policy" and "trade deals working for all Americans."

If the new White House website is anything to go by, the next four years will be markedly different from the last eight. 

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Natasha Noman

Natasha is a News Staff Writer covering global affairs. She previously reported on regional affairs from Pakistan. Natasha is based in New York and can be reached at natasha@mic.com.

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