After inauguration, @Trump_Regrets continues to be a catalogue of broken #MAGA dreams. Sad!

Source: NICHOLAS KAMM/Getty Images

Before President Donald Trump even took the oath of office, some of his once-supporters were already experiencing buyers' remorse. The Twitter account @Trump_Regrets has been cataloging supporters' complaints since Trump's election and, in the eyes of some of his voters, the beginning of the downward slide. 

One "Dick Sandwich" said he is so disappointed in his chosen leader's actions that he would like to take back his vote. Too bad that's impossible, Dick.

Fendi Swagg blamed her hair color for being tricked into thinking Trump would be a sufficient advocate for the the middle class.

Another user felt voter's remorse after Trump moved to restart construction on the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines. 

And another was let down by the GOP tax plan.

Yet it's the futility of demanding a do-over that undercuts the schadenfreude some liberals might feel while perusing @Trump_Regrets and other such mourning outlets. For those who expected this from Trump — behavior so bad that he and he alone warranted a 30-second tick forward on the Doomsday Clock — well, it doesn't feel good to be proved right. 

Those people probably expected Trump, a climate change denier, to prioritize the interests of the oil industry over the environment. Yet many Trump voters registered concern over the two executive orders the president signed Tuesday that will likely mean the resumption of construction of the contentious, widely protested Dakota Access pipeline along its previously planned route. 

That the president is expanding, rather than draining, the swamp is another point of contention. 

Many were disappointed in the apparent lack of self-control the new president demonstrates. 

Some pleaded with him to rethink his Affordable Care Act repeal. 

And it would seem people do actually care about those tax returns he refuses to share with the American public.

@realDonaldTrump, are you listening?

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Claire Lampen

Claire is a staff writer at Mic who covers women's issues and reproductive rights. She is based in New York and can be reached at claire@mic.com.

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