Trumpcare would cause 24 million people to lose health insurance by 2026, according to CBO

Trumpcare would cause 24 million people to lose health insurance by 2026, according to CBO
Source: AP
Source: AP

President Donald Trump received terrible news on Monday for his effort to "repeal and replace" the Affordable Care Act.

The Congressional Budget Office predicted the House Republican health care plan will cause 14 million people to lose their health care coverage by 2018. That number skyrockets to 24 million uninsured by 2026.

In other words, by 2026, the number of uninsured Americans would nearly double, rising to 52 million up from 28 million who currently lack insurance under the ACA — breaking Trump's pledge to provide coverage to all Americans.

The terrible CBO score adds yet another kink to Trump and his party's plan to repeal the ACA, often known as Obamacare.

House conservatives are balking at the GOP proposal — dubbed the American Health Care Act — because they feel it's not conservative enough. Senate Republicans, on the other hand, are wary of a plan that decimates the Medicaid expansion the ACA provided — putting health care out of reach for low-income residents of their state.

Republicans expected the CBO score would bring bad news. But the official release will now make it even harder to get reluctant Republicans to vote on the legislation — as a vote to raise costs for millions of Americans, while kicking millions others off their current plans, is a political lightning rod that could cause congressional Republicans problems at the ballot box in the 2018 midterm elections.

"They'll be penalized for it," Stu Rothenberg, a nonpartisan political analyst, said in an interview of Republicans who vote for this plan. "It's as simple as that."

Correction: March 13, 2017 
A previous version of this story misrepresented how many Americans would lose health care under Trumpcare, as predicted by the Congressional Budget Office. Fourteen million people could lose their health care coverage by 2018, and 24 million by 2026.

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Emily C. Singer

Emily C. Singer, née Cahn, is a senior writer for Mic covering politics. She is based in New York and can be reached at esinger@mic.com

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