Paul Ryan embraces report that says 24 million will lose coverage under GOP health plan

Source: AP
Source: AP

House Speaker Paul Ryan celebrated the nonpartisan report which showed his health care plan would cause 24 million people to lose their health coverage over the next decade, saying in a statement that the Republican plan would "lower premiums and improve access to quality, affordable care."

"This legislation will provide massive tax relief, dramatically reduce the deficit, and make the most fundamental entitlement reform in more than a generation," Ryan said of the Congressional Budget Office's report.

While it's true the CBO report says the GOP's health care proposal — known as the American Health Care Act — will lower the deficit, the cost savings come from cutting the Medicaid expansion and reducing subsidies that helped Americans afford health insurance.

"The largest savings would come from reductions in outlays for Medicaid and from the elimination of the Affordable Care Act's subsidies for non-group health insurance," according to the CBO report.

And, while the CBO report said younger people could see their premiums drop, low-income seniors get hit hard. By 2026, a 64-year-old who does not receive employer-sponsored insurance could see their cost rise 20% to 25%, according to the CBO.

Ryan, however, made no mention of those increased costs, or the reason for the savings in his statement.

"Our plan is not about forcing people to buy expensive, one-size-fits-all coverage," Ryan said. "It is about giving people more choices and better access to a plan they want and can afford."

While Ryan celebrated the CBO report, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price decried it during a news conference at the White House, saying the Trump administration disagrees "strenuously" with the CBO's numbers.

Price said the CBO report is not taking into account other steps the Trump administration will take to try and reduce costs and insure more people.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Emily C. Singer

Emily C. Singer, née Cahn, is a senior writer for Mic covering politics. She is based in New York and can be reached at esinger@mic.com

MORE FROM

Report: Rex Tillerson may drop Iraq, Myanmar from child soldiers list

Tillerson overruled his own staff, who said neither country has actually stopped using child soldiers.

Donald Trump is now blaming Obama for Russian election interference

Trump tweeted Obama "choked" on Russia, adding he thinks Obama was trying to protect Hillary Clinton.

Former Obama defense official: Russia hacks are "political equivalent of 9/11"

"I don't see much evidence of a response," Vickers added.

Groups spending millions to defeat Senate health care bill: "We win or lose over the next week"

"We've been hearing Republicans talk about repeal for seven years. It comes down to these next seven days."

CNN sent a sketch artist to Sean Spicer's off-camera press briefing

The sketch artist normally covers scenes from the Supreme Court.

The Trump administration just pulled funding from a group that fights white extremism

Right wing violence is heating up, and the Justice Department is looking the other way.

Report: Rex Tillerson may drop Iraq, Myanmar from child soldiers list

Tillerson overruled his own staff, who said neither country has actually stopped using child soldiers.

Donald Trump is now blaming Obama for Russian election interference

Trump tweeted Obama "choked" on Russia, adding he thinks Obama was trying to protect Hillary Clinton.

Former Obama defense official: Russia hacks are "political equivalent of 9/11"

"I don't see much evidence of a response," Vickers added.

Groups spending millions to defeat Senate health care bill: "We win or lose over the next week"

"We've been hearing Republicans talk about repeal for seven years. It comes down to these next seven days."

CNN sent a sketch artist to Sean Spicer's off-camera press briefing

The sketch artist normally covers scenes from the Supreme Court.

The Trump administration just pulled funding from a group that fights white extremism

Right wing violence is heating up, and the Justice Department is looking the other way.