New progressive group raises over $1 million to challenge GOP after health care vote

New progressive group raises over $1 million to challenge GOP after health care vote
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Just three days after House Republicans celebrated their successful health care vote with beer and cigars, a new progressive group has raised more than $1 million to try and kick them out of office. 

Swing Left, a recently created political action committee devoted to supporting Democratic candidates in what are expected to be swing districts in the 2018 midterm elections, has already raised $1.3 million — the vast majority of which was raised in the days after Republicans in the House of Representatives passed a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.  

In a press release the day after the vote, Swing Left announced it had received donations from nearly 20,000 individual donors. "The overwhelming response we've seen from countless Americans ensures that many House Republicans will quickly regret their vote, and sends a clear signal to those in both the House and Senate that supporting the AHCA and the Republican agenda comes with a political price," Ethan Todras-Whitehill, Swing Left's executive director and cofounder, said in a statement.

Democrats have cast the health care bill, which now heads to the Senate for consideration, as an attempt to take health care away from millions and allow insurance companies in some states to discriminate against people with pre-existing conditions.

Other progressive groups like Daily Kos, the liberal blog that helped boost the profiles of Democratic special election candidates like Jon Ossoff and Rob Quist, have also raised considerable sums of money.

Across the country, progressive candidates are already throwing their hats into the ring against GOP representatives in vulnerable districts — and outside groups are already running ads against those GOP incumbents, slamming them for their AHCA votes.

If this kind of momentum continues into 2018, Republicans may regret having been so quick to break out those celebratory cigars. 

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Andrew Joyce

I cover politics and policy.

MORE FROM

Report: Robert Mueller is broadening Russia investigation to include Trump’s business transactions

The news comes a day after President Donald Trump said an expansion of Mueller's investigation would be a "violation."

Jeff Sessions: “I plan to continue” as attorney general

Sessions said he has no intention to resign, despite President Donald Trump's frustrations with him.

Donald Trump’s defense: Everyone has wronged me

Russia continues to be the president's biggest albatross.

Trump just warned Robert Mueller not to look into his finances — it might be too late for that

In an interview with the 'New York Times,' Trump warned Mueller not to look into his finances. But Trump's bank is already getting calls from the feds.

Trump suggests that the FBI director should report directly to him

Such an unprecedented arrangement would have considerable implications for the agencies independence.

New White House idea to woo moderates: take health care from the poorest to cover Medicaid expansion

The plan would take from the poorest and give to the slightly less poor.

Report: Robert Mueller is broadening Russia investigation to include Trump’s business transactions

The news comes a day after President Donald Trump said an expansion of Mueller's investigation would be a "violation."

Jeff Sessions: “I plan to continue” as attorney general

Sessions said he has no intention to resign, despite President Donald Trump's frustrations with him.

Donald Trump’s defense: Everyone has wronged me

Russia continues to be the president's biggest albatross.

Trump just warned Robert Mueller not to look into his finances — it might be too late for that

In an interview with the 'New York Times,' Trump warned Mueller not to look into his finances. But Trump's bank is already getting calls from the feds.

Trump suggests that the FBI director should report directly to him

Such an unprecedented arrangement would have considerable implications for the agencies independence.

New White House idea to woo moderates: take health care from the poorest to cover Medicaid expansion

The plan would take from the poorest and give to the slightly less poor.