Ed Lee is Right to Run For Reelection in San Francisco

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee announced yesterday that he intends on running for reelection on November 8. Lee was appointed to the position of interim mayor in January to complete the term of Gavin Newsom, who had stepped down to become lieutenant governor. Lee promised not to run in November after he had been appointed – a factor that played a part in his being chosen for the position.

Even though Lee’s decision to run has received mixed responses since he earlier promised that he would not run, his choice to recant on his previous assurance and run for reelection is justified, since it comes in response to vocal calls from petitioners for Lee to run.

Lee’s supporters, undoubtedly, are thrilled on his change of heart, especially since many have been urging him to run over the past few months. The community-organized “Run Ed Run” campaign, aimed to convince Lee to run for mayor this November, was launched over the summer by five political figures, including the president of the San Francisco Planning Commission.  The movement quickly gained traction and boasted more than 51,000 supporters – all eager for Lee to run for reelection – at the beginning of August.

Further, Lee has been endorsed by the “San Franciscans for Jobs and Good Government” – an independent expenditure committee.  The committee has been funded by Ron Conway, a prominent angel investor based in Silicon Valley, and Sean Parker, of Facebook and Napster fame.  Lee has also received endorsement and support from prominent cultural and political icons such as M.C. Hammer, Brian Wilson, and will.i.am (video below). 

With the electorate vocalizing such strong support for Lee, it is no surprise that he has chosen to run again.  And it is no problem, either – because even though Lee has turned on his word, he is responding to the calls of his voters.

 


Photo Credit: Leader Nancy Pelosi

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Masuma Ahuja

Having lived on three continents, I'm particularly interested in global issues and international politics. I'm a recent graduate from Oxford, with an honors BA in Politics, Philosophy, and Economics. I've also worked on the hill, in microfinance, and for various nonprofits and media outlets.

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