Did Ray Lewis Kill a Man? Ravens Linebacker Dodged the Question In Pre-Super Bowl Interview

The controversy over Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis' 2000 murder investigation keeps heating up, despite the team's Sunday Super Bowl 47 victory and the obvious efforts by the mainstream media of glossing over the one blemish on an otherwise stellar athletic career.

According to NBC Sports, CBS let Lewis dodge the question over a pre-Super Bowl 47 one-on-one interview conducted by Lewis' former teammate — and ardent defender — Shannon Sharpe. Here's the exchange:   

Sharpe: A couple of weeks ago, the family of the incident in 2000 — and I'm paraphrasing — but it goes something like this: 'While Ray Lewis is being celebrated by millions, two men tragically and brutally died in Atlanta. Ray Lewis knows more than Ray Lewis ever shared.' What would you like to say to the families?

Lewis: It's simple, you know. God has never made a mistake. That's just who He is, you see? And if our system — this is the sad thing about our system — if our system took the time to really investigate what happened 13 years ago, maybe they would have got to the bottom-line truth. But the saddest thing ever was that a man looked me in my face and told me, 'we know you didn't do this, but you're going down for it anyway.' To the family, if you knew — if you really knew — the way God works, He don't use people who commits anything like that for His glory. No way. It's the total opposite.

But while NBC Sports seems skeptical, PolicyMic's own Lenny DeFranco addressed the question by stating, "[though] Lewis' vicious on-field persona and his silence on the issue since then have contributed to the assumption that he is guilty. [However, though] He did lie to the police about being there, but that is quite different from being responsible for two deaths."

Weight In: Are the media trying to crucify Lewis or are these concerns legitimate? 

How much do you trust the information in this article?

MORE FROM

What to watch when you’re not watching ‘Game of Thrones’

There's some good shows out there you might be missing, and also CBS's 'Zoo'.

HBO programming president defends ‘Confederate,’ says network is “standing by” the writers

“We could’ve done a better job with the press rollout,” HBO programming president Casey Bloys admitted.

‘Game of Thrones’: These are the funniest people to follow on Twitter for live updates

A good tweet is the best antidote to scenes like Sam cutting open Mormont's greyscale sores.

Let’s overanalyze these ‘Game of Thrones’ photos from “The Queen’s Justice”

Jon Snow's going to meet his Aunt Daenerys.

‘Dunkirk’ is a Christopher Nolan movie that doesn’t need to be solved

For his new World War II epic, the puzzle-focused filmmaker decided to adjust his approach to storytelling.

Ilana Glazer and Abbi Jacobson talk ‘Broad City’ season 4 and their prayers for Hillary Clinton

"Art has just become exponentially more political since the election," Glazer said.

What to watch when you’re not watching ‘Game of Thrones’

There's some good shows out there you might be missing, and also CBS's 'Zoo'.

HBO programming president defends ‘Confederate,’ says network is “standing by” the writers

“We could’ve done a better job with the press rollout,” HBO programming president Casey Bloys admitted.

‘Game of Thrones’: These are the funniest people to follow on Twitter for live updates

A good tweet is the best antidote to scenes like Sam cutting open Mormont's greyscale sores.

Let’s overanalyze these ‘Game of Thrones’ photos from “The Queen’s Justice”

Jon Snow's going to meet his Aunt Daenerys.

‘Dunkirk’ is a Christopher Nolan movie that doesn’t need to be solved

For his new World War II epic, the puzzle-focused filmmaker decided to adjust his approach to storytelling.

Ilana Glazer and Abbi Jacobson talk ‘Broad City’ season 4 and their prayers for Hillary Clinton

"Art has just become exponentially more political since the election," Glazer said.