Bubba Craft: Bubba Watson's Hovercraft Golf Cart Just Made the Sport a Lot Cooler

Golfing just got even more exciting, if you can believe it. Pro golfer, Bubba Watson has teamed up with Oakley to create the “BW1,” — or "Bubba Craft" — a golf cart that hovers over the green on a pillow of air instead of rolling on it with wheels. Introducing, the world’s first hovercraft golf cart.

A modification on the Chris Fitzgerald Hovercraft, an already existing hovercraft that is actually manufactured and used for personal and professional purposes, the “BW1” has many more advantages than a traditional golf cart. While normal golf carts can leave tracks and marks on the green as they move across, this hovering golf cart leaves nothing behind as it floats in the air. The other awesome thing that the “BW1” has the ability to do is move across water or sand, speeding things up quite a bit when traveling to the next hole.


The hovering golf cart was featured in an advertisement for Oakley, although it is not expected to be hitting courses any time soon. In the video Watson boasts about the craft saying it moves through all kinds of terrain without any bumps, including in and out of the woods. The video also features Chris Fitzgerald, the president of Neoteric Hovercraft Inc. discussing what it was like to fuse the basics of a golf cart with hovercraft technology. Watson goes on to mention that he got into golf because he liked driving golf carts; perhaps this is the source of his apparent passion for golf cart improvement.

Not only does this new kind of golf cart seem to be way more reasonable than what golfers have been using for years, but it also looks like a pretty good time to drive. It looks like this exciting and weird development could some day bring a new generation of carts into the world of golf.

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Julia Birnbaum

Julia Birnbaum is a student at Sarah Lawrence college with a passion for writing and a love for all things pop. Julia is currently studying abroad in Florence, Italy.

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