CitiBikes NYC Inspires "The Fat Jew" to Start Soul Cycle Class For Homeless People

The elite of New York already hate the new CitiBikes for being so unsightly. But here's something that will make them hate the bikes even more.

Comedian "The Fat Jew," otherwise known as Fabrizio Goldstein, has started holding Soul Cycle classes for New York's homeless ... on docked CitiBikes.

For those who don't know what Soul Cycle is, it's basically the next cult workout that takes indoor cycling to a new level. The website reads that it combines "inspirational coaching" and "high-energy music," which has also been interpreted as people in crop tops yelling at you to feel the vibe and Daft Punk. Did I mention that you cycle by candlelight to help find your soul?

It's basically the kind of workout that only those with spare cash and bad taste can afford to indulge in, while those without that kind of disposable income must be content with home workout videos and Planet Fitness. For the homeless, the options are naturally even less, and many don't have the time or money to invest in fitness while they're trying to get back on their feet.

That's why Goldstein is starting these classes. "Indoor cycling, it's too expensive, it's not available to everybody," he told an interviewer. Tongue-in-cheek, he went on, "I want the homeless people of New York to have the opportunity to have sick bodies. They could have really gorgeous bodies, they just need the right workout regimen."

Whether or not his plan works (and how long he plans to keep it up), this may well become a real activity for the homeless in New York. And while it hasn't been long enough to test the results on the fitness of the homeless population, at least one participant reported that his legs "feel better."

Get a sneak-peek of his Goldstein's classes below:


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Medha Chandorkar

As a junior at Georgetown University in Washington DC, I'm studying Government, Women's and Gender Studies, and Justice and Peace Studies. I'm interested in social justice issues, particularly women's rights in the developing world, and politics. Outside of school, I love dancing and reading, and I'm a huge TV / movie buff. In the future, I hope to become a lawyer but right now, I'm just focused on the moment.

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