PolicyMic Songs of the Week: What Our Arts Editors Can't Stop Listening To

PolicyMic Songs of the Week: What Our Arts Editors Can't Stop Listening To

Much like our readers, PolicyMic's Arts & Entertainment editors have pretty diverse tastes in music. Because we hope our section can be a place you can turn to for cultural recommendations from your peers, we're sharing some of the songs that we've had on repeat in our office (well, in our headphones in our office) lately.

Right now, it seems we're really into classic country and synth-laden electropop. Check out what we can't stop listening to, and then let us know in the comments what song is making your week!

1. "In A Razor Town" by Jason Isbell

I've been listening to this song since reading the story on Isbell in American SongwriterHe accused Dierks Bentley of stealing the chorus for a bad pop country song. The melodies are sort of similar, but "In A Razor Town" is a much better song. The lyrics tell the story of a failed relationship by situating it in a place — it reminds me some of Springsteen's lyrics on Darkness on the Edge of Town. For me, it's up there with Isbell's best from the Drive-By Truckers and his latest record, Southeastern.

Ben Naddaff-Hafrey, A&E Publishing Editor

2. "Pamela Brown" by Tom T. Hall

I've been listening to "Pamela Brown" on repeat all week. I'm a huge country music fan and after reading so much about the country wars going on right now, I wanted to get back to a country classic and try and wipe my palate clean of songs like "Boys Round Here."

Elena Sheppard, A&E Head Editor

3. "Amenamy" by Purity Ring

This song isn't new, but I've been on a Purity Ring binge lately. Maybe this is because it's almost Halloween and the band is kind of creepy sounding. With its heavily processed female vocals layered over retro-synth pop, Purity Ring is a bit like a moodier Chvrches. Hip-hop inspired drum beats offer a nice contrast to lead singer Megan James' delicate vocals, and while I'm not entirely sure what her lyrics mean, they sure do sound poetic.

Julianne Ross, A&E Deputy Editor