Watch Nancy Grace Argue With Herself About Marijuana — and Lose

Who doesn't love Nancy Grace? Oh, right. Most people.

Well then, you might just enjoy this video of Nancy Grace debating… Nancy Grace. In this edited (duh) YouTube video, the great Nancy Grace argues with herself over the effects of smoking marijuana. Yes, it's as great as it sounds. Watch:


On January 14, Grace, who is no stranger to outlandish statements, argued that people high on pot "shoot each other… stab each other… strangle each other… kill whole families." That over-the-top comment (which came during a debate with the Director of Communications of the Marijuana Policy Project) warranted, for some reason, a fact check from Politifact, which rated it "Mostly False." Because, you know, while someone high on pot might be capable of doing those things, so might a person not high on pot.

Anyway, Grace's comments that pot drives people to become homicidal maniacs differs from some of her previous stances on marijuana (and public opinion), so this YouTube video was created to put Grace up against the most formidable opponent possible: herself. 

Personally, I think the Grace in the green shirt wins. 

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Benjamin Cosman

Ben graduated from SUNY Geneseo with a B.A. in English Literature and a minor in Political Science. He recently traveled through New England looking for pie. His second-favorite pastime is googling pictures of politicians laughing.

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