The Perfect Comic for Anyone Who Thinks Everyday Sexism Isn't a Big Deal

The Perfect Comic for Anyone Who Thinks Everyday Sexism Isn't a Big Deal

For women, one of the most frustrating aspects of everyday sexism is convincing men that it actually exists.

Despite the ubiquity of street harassment, reproductive health discrimination and slut-shaming, some people still refuse to accept that these practices are a big deal. Well, they are. And they can make women's lives really, really difficult.

Luckily, Robot Hugs is here with a new web comic designed to convince sexism-deniers that sexual harassment is, in fact, very real, that you should listen to women when they say they've experienced it and that men can be invaluable allies when it comes to fighting everyday sexism.

The comic also reminds us all that public spaces are not synonymous with male spaces, and that women have the right to move throughout the world without being made to feel frightened or violated. And make no mistake, that's exactly what harassment does; as a friendly reminder, catcalling is not a compliment, won't get anyone laid and often makes the harassee feel angry, annoyed and disgusted.

I'll let Robot Hugs do the rest of the talking. And remember that you too can prevent sexual harassment!


Have you had experience with everyday sexism? Let me know on Twitter.

Comic posted with permission from Robot-Hugs.

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Julianne Ross

Julianne is the Opinion Editor at Mic. Her writing has also appeared in places like TheAtlantic.com, Boston.com, Everyday Feminism and Role Reboot.

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