What is Trump's approval rating on his first day of presidency?

Source: Pool/Getty Images

President Donald Trump is settling into the Oval Office as one of the least popular incoming presidents in modern history. 

A number of polls conducted in the second week of January, right before he was sworn into office, put Trump's favorability rating around 40%. 

To put that in context, the last three presidents have had approval ratings above 60% immediately before their first inaugurations — Barack Obama had a 78% approval rating during the interregnum. 

The Trumps and the Obamas on Trump's Inauguration Day
Source: Pool/Getty Images

And polls notwithstanding, Saturday's global Women's March, largely in response to Trump's inauguration, showed the extent of the public's discontent. Around three times as many people showed up in Washington, D.C. for the Women's March than they did for Trump's inauguration, crowd experts estimate

While there are no official numbers, the inauguration had an estimated 160,000 people, compared to the following day's protest, with estimates between 470,000 and 500,000.

An estimated 2.5 million people participated in the myriad Women's Marches organized around the globe.

Saturday's Women's March on Washington
Source: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The Trump administration responded defensively, with the new president asking, via his non-presidential account, where the protesters were on Election Day.

But, as many pointed out, Trump's opponents did vote, as evidenced by the fact he lost the popular vote by nearly 3 million

Trump's unpopularity also became evident on social media. Side-by-side images of Trump and Obama's inaugural ceremonies circulated, betraying a stark disparity in attendance (Obama's first inauguration drew 1.8 million people to the Capitol). 

Part of the Trump administration's response involved having White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer use his first-ever White House press briefing to lie.

"This was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period," he said to reporters during Saturday's press briefing.

On Sunday, Spicer's lie became the focus of a viral contretemps between Meet the Press' Chuck Todd and Trump's counselor Kellyanne Conway when Conway said Spicer simply offered the press "alternative facts."

Suffice it to say, Trump will be starting his first week of presidency as a populist man, but not a popular one. 

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Natasha Noman

Natasha is a News Staff Writer covering global affairs. She previously reported on regional affairs from Pakistan. Natasha is based in New York and can be reached at natasha@mic.com.

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