Intelligence officials have corroborated parts of leaked dossier, CNN reports

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

United States investigators have corroborated some details of the 35-page dossier that sparked controversy just 10 days before President Donald Trump's inauguration. 

According to CNN, intelligence officials were able to confirm that the communications "senior Russian officials and other Russian individuals" occurred in the same places and on the same days cited in the dossier, giving investigators "greater confidence" in the veracity of other portions of the document.

When CNN reached out to White House press secretary Sean Spicer for comment on Friday, he told the outlet, "We continue to be disgusted by CNN's fake news reporting." 

He later called back, stating, "It is about time CNN focused on the success the president has had bringing back jobs, protecting the nation and strengthening relationships with Japan and other nations. The president won the election because of his vision and message for the nation."

Trump addressed the dossier at his Jan. 11 press conference.
Source: 
Don Emmert/Getty Images

It's worth emphasizing, as many officials did in interviews with CNN, that investigators have not confirmed any of the so-called "salacious" details that many found most memorable about the dossier.

Those details, of course, refer to allegations that Trump hired sex workers to perform a "golden showers" show on the same bed former President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama had once slept on. 

At his January press conference, Trump vehemently denied this detail, stating, "Does anyone really believe that story? I'm also very much of a germaphobe, by the way, believe me."

As scandalous as this tidbit may be, U.S. investigators have much bigger fish to fry. The dossier's most serious allegations involve supposed communications among Trump's top advisers and Russian officials during his presidential campaign.

It's likely the finer points of these alleged exchanges investigators are interested in most.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Marie Solis

Marie is a Slay staff writer with focuses in culture and class. Her writing has appeared in Gothamist and the Awl. You can reach her at marie@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Senate Republicans' Obamacare repeal bill may be flatlining

Republican leadership is scrambling to convert skeptical senators to let the bill move forward to a final vote.

One of Trump's warmest meetings with a world leader yet was Narendra Modi, an accused fascist

Modi hugged Trump during a White House visit on Monday — a far cry from 2002, when he was accused of massacring Muslims in Gujarat.

Donald Trump is hurting America's image around the world, new Pew Research Center study finds

The leader of the free world apparently has image problems at home AND abroad.

Even Donald Trump's schedule has become a victim of a White House push against transparency

"Unreportable" public schedules, off camera briefings, secret visitor logs ... Where does it end?

The CBO score says 22 million will lose coverage. Here's why it's actually a lot worse than that.

Republicans wrote the bill so that much of the coverage losses wouldn't be captured by the CBO report.

CBO Score: Senate Republican health care bill will cost 22 million people their coverage

That's 1 million fewer than under the House-passed health care bill.

Senate Republicans' Obamacare repeal bill may be flatlining

Republican leadership is scrambling to convert skeptical senators to let the bill move forward to a final vote.

One of Trump's warmest meetings with a world leader yet was Narendra Modi, an accused fascist

Modi hugged Trump during a White House visit on Monday — a far cry from 2002, when he was accused of massacring Muslims in Gujarat.

Donald Trump is hurting America's image around the world, new Pew Research Center study finds

The leader of the free world apparently has image problems at home AND abroad.

Even Donald Trump's schedule has become a victim of a White House push against transparency

"Unreportable" public schedules, off camera briefings, secret visitor logs ... Where does it end?

The CBO score says 22 million will lose coverage. Here's why it's actually a lot worse than that.

Republicans wrote the bill so that much of the coverage losses wouldn't be captured by the CBO report.

CBO Score: Senate Republican health care bill will cost 22 million people their coverage

That's 1 million fewer than under the House-passed health care bill.